Faber Lecture

Eberhard L. Faber Class of 1915 Memorial Lecture and Colloquium

Each year, the Program in European Cultural Studies invites a distinguished scholar of European culture and society to Princeton for a two-day visit. The scholar delivers the program’s most prestigious public lecture, the Eberhard L. Faber Class of 1915 Memorial Lecture in European Cultural Studies, and  also participates in a colloquium over a meal with ECS certificate students. Participation in an Eberhard L. Faber Class of 1915 Memorial Lecture and Colloquium is a requirement for completion of the ECS certificate, and students are encouraged to fulfill the requirement during the junior year.

Past Eberhard L. Faber Class of 1915 Memorial Lecturers in ECS:

  • John Hamilton, (Harvard University), “Emily Dickinson and the Word made Flesh” (October 25, 2015) poster
  • Thomas W. Laqueur (University of California, Berkeley), “Why Do We Care About Dead Bodies?” (February 26, 2015) poster
  • Carolyn Abbate (Harvard University), “Tristan, Isolde and the Soundtrack” (April 2013) poster
  • Christopher Wood (Yale University), “The Uninvited” (December 2011) poster
  • Jonathan Lear (University of Chicago), “Irony and the Freudian Uncanny” (December 2010)  lecture (limited to Princeton only)  poster
  • Robert Darnton (Harvard University), “The Devil in the Holy Water, or the Art of Slander in Eighteenth-Century France” (October 2009)  poster
  • Ewa Lajer-Burcharth (Harvard University), “Cruel Chardin” (April 2009)  poster
  • Andreas Huyssen (Columbia University), “Figures of Memory in the Course of Time: German Painting 1946-89” (April 2008)  poster
  • John Durham Peters (University of Iowa), “Media, Madness, and Modern Communication Breakdown” (March 2006)  poster
  • Martin Jay (UCLA/Institute for Advanced Study), “Somaesthetics and Democracy: John Dewey and Body Art” (2002)
  • Michael J. Roth (The Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities), “Making an Exhibition Historical ‘Freud: Conflict and Culture'” (1999)
  • Anne Goldgar (Kings College, London), “The British Museum and the Virtual Representation of Culture in the Eighteenth Century” (1998)
  • Andrey Zorin (Moscow State University and The Academy of Sciences), “The Semiotics of Everyday Life: New Approaches to Literature and History of Russia” (1995)
  • Paul Robinson (Stanford University), “The Opera Queen: A Voice from the Closet” (1994)
  • Carlo Ginzburg (UCLA), “The Philosopher and Witches” (1990)